Before recording his self-titled debut album, Dave played on albums by acts as varied as Joan Armatrading, U2, Ray Charles, Donny Osmond, Richard Marx and Gladys Knight & The Pips. For his debut, Dave teams with some of the music business’ best, including two artists who helped launch his career, Jeff Lorber and Bobby Caldwell. On his first album, Dave is supported by Lorber (keyboards), Buzz Feiten (guitar), Randy Jackson (bass) and Tom Scott (sax), with vocal contributions from Cole Basque and Joey Diggs. Dave plays the sax with a fresh, new, a-typical exuberance with a reach that includes the full spectrum of pop, jazz and R&B. His passion and joy for the saxophone is unmistakable – on the track “Love Of My Life,” the mix of funky beat and Ms Basque’s piercing vocal creates an unforgettable effect that lingers. Anyone who hears Dave’s debut is excited by his limitless potential and the imminent success which looms on the horizon. Listeners and musical contemporaries alike imagine the bright musical career that lay ahead for Dave and are thrilled by this Lucky Man who will soon come to define the smooth-jazz genre.

Fans of saxophonist Dave Koz from either his days playing EWI with the Rippingtons or his tours with lookalike pop star Richard Marx waited a long few years for this explosive debut, and Koz certainly delivers the goods with an absolutely smashing Sanborn-esque display of chops and seduction. The Marx effect is a definite plus, as Koz does wonders with a cover of the singer’s “Endless Summer Nights” and he co-wrote one of the disc’s best originals: “Give It Up” with Marx and Jeff Lorber (who is one of the album’s handful of producers). As in his previous work as a sideman, Koz proves an innovative player throughout. This project not only launched one of the great smooth jazz sax careers of the ’90s, but it was one of the first genre albums to spawn hit singles (the ballads “Emily” and “Castle of Dreams”) and VH1 videos. Pure dynamite, but Koz would later top even himself.